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Information about The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation
  Release 5: August 2008.
1. About the Database - a description of the contents of the database and its purpose.
2. Editorial Policy - detailed criteria used in selecting materials.
3. Editorial Advisors - individuals who have helped in the construction of the database.
4. Errata - known typographical and software errors to be fixed next release.
5. Release Notes - notes on this version.
6. Software Requirements - notes on which browsers are supported.
7. Technical Support - whom to contact for technical support.
8. Subscription and Free Trial Information - how to get a subscription or a trial.
9. License Agreement - licensing terms and conditions.
10. Acknowledgements - charter customers and individuals who contributed.
11. Copyright Statement - copyright terms and conditions.
12. Archiving - how this material is preserved for the future.
13. Cataloging Records - what kind of MARC records will be available for this collection.

1.   An Introduction to The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation

Emerging from the crises of schism, war, and plague, the Catholic Church entered the sixteenth century with an intensified awareness of the need for renewal. At all levels of the Catholic hierarchy, the call for reform in capite et in membris was being issued. And like their Protestant counterparts, Catholic authors took advantage of print technology to create a vast treasury of published documents. The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation makes the documentary riches of this era more accessible than ever, offering powerful functionalities that maximize the flexibility with which researchers can explore this historically important source material.

Alexander Street Press has worked with scholarly editors to develop a bibliography that includes hundreds of seminal but often hard-to-find works, including papal documents, synodal decrees, catechisms, confessors’ manuals, biblical commentaries, theological treatises, liturgical works, inquisitorial manuals, preaching guides, saints’ lives, and devotional literature. Offering extensive selections from authors as diverse as Robert Bellarmine, Antoine Arnauld, Johannes Cochlaeus, Michael Bajus, Thomas Stapleton, Cesare Baronio, Luis de Granada, and dozens more, the database represents the full range of ideas and opinions that sparked and sustained Catholic reform in the heady years before, during, and after the landmark decrees of the Council of Trent. As a companion collection to Alexander Street’s Digital Library of Classic Protestant Texts, The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation completes the picture of an era when religious debates irrevocably altered the course of Western history.

Motivated to go beyond mere keyword searching, we have aimed to assist scholars in locating sustained treatments of subject matter germane to their particular area of research. Every document in The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation has been hand-keyed, topically indexed, and carefully marked-up according to the highest-quality digital standards. Comprising more than 150 topics, our indexing thesaurus includes such terms as Church Authority, Free Will, Justification, Prayer & Meditation, Purgatory, The Arts, Attitudes towards Jews, Education & Learning, Religious Freedom, and the Religious and Social Role of Women. Researchers can efficiently navigate thousands of electronic pages, obtaining specifically targeted content in a matter of seconds. Useful not only to theologians and biblical scholars, but also to historians, political scientists, and sociologists studying the religious and social upheavals of the 16th and 17th centuries, The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation will help shed new light even on relatively familiar content.

Most of the works in The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation are period editions presented in their original languages of Latin, English, French, Italian, Spanish, and German. To maximize the research utility of the database, scholars have access not only to the fully-searchable text file, but also to a digital facsimile of each historically important edition chosen by our editors. This is just one of many carefully crafted features that make The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation a uniquely modern tool for exploring the foundational texts of Europe’s religious past.

Our goal is to provide resources that open new avenues of research for the next generation of scholars. We welcome your comments and suggestions as we strive to accomplish that goal.

 

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2.   Editorial Policy

The material for The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation has been selected by our editorial advisors according to the criteria below.

  • Works are generally published between 1500-1700.
  • Authors are all residents of Western Europe.
  • Documents are of a theological or religious nature.
  • Works display a broad representation of various religious orders and affiliations.
  • Works include a wide array of document types.
  • Period editions are preferred.
  • First edition works are preferred unless our scholarly editors have determined that a later edition is more noteworthy.

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3. Editorial Advisors

The following scholars have been instrumental in guiding text selection and assisting us in the design of the interface.

Simon Ditchfield is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of York. Currently at work on a major survey volume about the making of Roman Catholicism as a world religion (to be published as part of the Oxford History of the Christian Church series), he has written extensively about the urban and religious culture of the Italian peninsula from 1300 – 1800. Of particular interest to Professor Ditchfield is the way that previous societies have perceived and used the past. His other interests include: politics and procedures of canonization; hagiography; history writing; history of scholarship; conditions of enquiry in Early Modern Europe; and history of travel. Among the books authored by Professor Ditchfield is Liturgy, Sanctity and History in Tridentine Italy: Pietro Maria Campi and the Preservation of the Particular (Cambridge, 1995). In addition to serving on multiple international editorial boards, he is a member of the Accademia di S. Carlo, Milan and a co-series editor of Sacro/santo.

Brad S. Gregory is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. The 2005 recipient of the Hiett Prize in the Humanities, Professor Gregory’s research and teaching interests focus on early modern Europe, in particular the Reformation era. Prior to taking his position at Notre Dame, he was an Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University where he received the Walter J. Gores Award, Stanford’s highest teaching honor. His book Salvation at Stake: Christian Martyrdom in Early Modern Europe won numerous awards, including the 1999 Thomas J. Wilson Prize as the best first book published by Harvard University Press and the California Book Award Silver Medal for Nonfiction. Professor Gregory is currently at work on Storming Heaven: Christianity in the Reformation Era, which is slated to be published by Harvard University Press.

 

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4.   Errata

Our goal is to have no errors in this database.   Please report any errors by sending an e-mail to Editor@AlexanderStreet.com.

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5.   Release Notes

The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation includes 845 titles by 277 authors.

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6.   Software Requirements

The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation is optimized to operate with Microsoft Internet Explorer 7.0 or higher, and Firefox 3.0. (We are aware that the "select terms" feature of our Find and Search is not performing well in Firefox 3.5.2. Upgrading to the latest version of Firefox will resolve this issue.)

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7.   Technical Support

You can contact us by:

When reporting a problem please include your customer name, e-mail address, phone number, domain name or IP address and that of your web proxy server, if used.

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8.   Subscription and Free Trial Information

The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation is available for one-time purchase of perpetual access or as an annual subscription. Please contact us at sales@alexanderstreet.com if you wish to begin a subscription or to request a free 30-day trial.

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9.   License Agreement

Terms of Use

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10.   Acknowledgements

Our thanks to:

 
Peter Cooper

Director of Religious Publishing, Alexander Street Press

Joseph F. X. Sladky

Indexing Editor, Alexander Street Press

Andrew Sulavik

Indexer, Alexander Street Press

Ryan Moore

Indexer, Alexander Street Press

George Nursey

Indexer, Alexander Street Press

Martin Latterner

Indexer, Alexander Street Press

Amalia Levy

Indexer, Alexander Street Press

Matt Bowen

Indexer, Alexander Street Press

Pat Carlson

Production, Alexander Street Press

Alyssa Theodore

Production, Alexander Street Press

Zoshia Minto

Production, Alexander Street Press

Graham Carter-Dimmock

Software Development, Alexander Street Press

John Cicero

Software Development, Alexander Street Press

Ning Zhu

Software Development, Alexander Street Press

Charles Cooney

University of Chicago

Mark Olsen

University of Chicago

Catherine Mardikes

University of Chicago

Don Fuller

Founder, Ad Fontes

Ann Sneesby-Koch

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Albert Gunn

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Daniel Robinson

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Christine Sowder

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Dave Albertson

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Peter White

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Ted Jackson

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Paul Burnett

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Faith Bonvenizer

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Brandon Jones

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

John Shanabrook

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Brian Lee

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Johnathan Loopstra

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Kenneth Draper

Indexer-Editor, Ad Fontes

Georgianna Lee Dandy Production, Ad Fontes
Emily Scott Production, Ad Fontes
Katarine Lvovskaya Production, Ad Fontes
Hilary Ayers Production, Ad Fontes
John Holland Software Development, Ad Fontes
Anthony Lewandoski Software Development, Ad Fontes
David Burton Software Development, Ad Fontes

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11.   Copyright Statement

All materials in The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation are protected under U.S. and International Copyright Law. Fair use under the law permits reproduction of single copies for personal research and private use. Further transmission, reproduction, or presentation of protected items requires the written permission of the copyright owners.

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12.   Archiving

Texts produced for The Digital Library of the Catholic Reformation are considered research materials and receive the same level of stewardship as books, paper documents, and photographs. Once complete, copies of the database will be given to all purchasing institutions, so ensuring that the materials are available to subsequent generations.

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13.   Cataloging Records

MARC records will soon be available for this collection. Records will point to each book, series, or manuscript. This will enable patrons to link directly from a public access catalog to all documents pertaining to that publication.

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